st. paul

Showing 3 posts tagged st. paul

Mystery Window
Our hardworking intern Blaine has been processing the Larsen Stained Glass collection of drawings and plans for mostly church windows.  She has identified quite a few.  The window above has been a stumper.  On the back of the window it says, “Catholic Church - St. Paul.”  We’ve contacted the archdiocese but it is clear that these windows are not in the Cathedral.
The three men on the window are Father Galtier, Bishop Cretin and Archbishop Ireland.  Father Lucien Galtier founded the first church in St. Paul, which led to it’s name change from “Pig’s Eye Landing” to St. Paul.  Bishop Cretin was the first bishop of St. Paul, MN.  He came from the Dubuque, Iowa diocese that sent Galtier to Minnesota.  Archbishop Ireland brought the St. Paul archdiocese into the 20th Century and founded St. Paul Seminary and the University of St. Thomas.
If anybody has an idea of what St. Paul Catholic church this window is from, please email us: specialcoll [at] hclib.org. High-res

Mystery Window

Our hardworking intern Blaine has been processing the Larsen Stained Glass collection of drawings and plans for mostly church windows.  She has identified quite a few.  The window above has been a stumper.  On the back of the window it says, “Catholic Church - St. Paul.”  We’ve contacted the archdiocese but it is clear that these windows are not in the Cathedral.

The three men on the window are Father Galtier, Bishop Cretin and Archbishop Ireland.  Father Lucien Galtier founded the first church in St. Paul, which led to it’s name change from “Pig’s Eye Landing” to St. Paul.  Bishop Cretin was the first bishop of St. Paul, MN.  He came from the Dubuque, Iowa diocese that sent Galtier to Minnesota.  Archbishop Ireland brought the St. Paul archdiocese into the 20th Century and founded St. Paul Seminary and the University of St. Thomas.

If anybody has an idea of what St. Paul Catholic church this window is from, please email us: specialcoll [at] hclib.org.

utnereader:

The Literary Way to Save Cash on Literature: Book readings don’t usually have the, shall we say, glamour of a rock concert or blockbuster film. After one spectacularly under-attended reading in Minneapolis, five organizations, including three local independent publishers—Milkweed Editions, Coffee House Press, and Graywolf Press—the Loft Literary Center, and Rain Taxi Review of Books, were downright dejected. This wasn’t the first time this had happened, and they presumed it wouldn’t be the last.
The organizations sought a creative way to get the Minneapolis and St. Paul literary communities together more often. Some bookstores have been charging customers to go to readings, but the literary quintet preferred to attract crowds and support authors with a carrot rather than a stick. Their solution resembles a trick that coffee shops have used to keep customers coming back: a punch card. Or in this case, a Literary Punch Card.
High-res

utnereader:

The Literary Way to Save Cash on Literature: Book readings don’t usually have the, shall we say, glamour of a rock concert or blockbuster film. After one spectacularly under-attended reading in Minneapolis, five organizations, including three local independent publishers—Milkweed Editions, Coffee House Press, and Graywolf Press—the Loft Literary Center, and Rain Taxi Review of Books, were downright dejected. This wasn’t the first time this had happened, and they presumed it wouldn’t be the last.

The organizations sought a creative way to get the Minneapolis and St. Paul literary communities together more often. Some bookstores have been charging customers to go to readings, but the literary quintet preferred to attract crowds and support authors with a carrot rather than a stick. Their solution resembles a trick that coffee shops have used to keep customers coming back: a punch card. Or in this case, a Literary Punch Card.

Has tale of Twin Cities become one?
(via Has tale of Twin Cities become one? | StarTribune.com)
An interesting question.  Traditionally, St. Paul has been called the last Eastern city and Minneapolis the first Western city.  There was a distinct rivalry in the 1800s and early 1900s between the two cities in population growth and economic development.
Minneapolis-St. Paul by John S. Adams and Barbara J. VanDrasek notes, “Relics of earlier ethnic concentrations are rapidly disappearing, but the religious and moral differences persist. St Paulites, being more dominantly southern German, Austrian, and Irish, tend to be Catholics…Minneapolis is about as Protestant as St. Paul is Catholic.” The headquarters of Thrivent Financial for Lutherans and Augsburg Fortress Publishing bear witness to the continued Lutheran legacy in Minneapolis. High-res

Has tale of Twin Cities become one?

(via Has tale of Twin Cities become one? | StarTribune.com)

An interesting question.  Traditionally, St. Paul has been called the last Eastern city and Minneapolis the first Western city.  There was a distinct rivalry in the 1800s and early 1900s between the two cities in population growth and economic development.

Minneapolis-St. Paul by John S. Adams and Barbara J. VanDrasek notes, “Relics of earlier ethnic concentrations are rapidly disappearing, but the religious and moral differences persist. St Paulites, being more dominantly southern German, Austrian, and Irish, tend to be Catholics…Minneapolis is about as Protestant as St. Paul is Catholic.” The headquarters of Thrivent Financial for Lutherans and Augsburg Fortress Publishing bear witness to the continued Lutheran legacy in Minneapolis.