minneapolis

Showing 26 posts tagged minneapolis

Track

Blast off! radio advertisement

Artist

Minneapolis Public Library

Album

5" reel of ads for KBEM

Blast off into the Space Age! Plot your orbit to include the Minneapolis Public Library!

Special Collections continues to digitize a collection of reel tapes that date from the 1970s. These tapes were generated by, what was then, the Minneapolis Public Library. Most of the reels are recordings that were included in the library’s regular weekly program, Bookends.

This particular reel contains spot ads that were intended for broadcast on local Minneapolis radio station, KBEM. The voice you hear is that of station instructor, Warren Christy. Stay tuned for more sound clip highlights from the archive.

Loring Park by T.M. Read
We’re ending National Poetry month with a poem from the past. This poem about Loring Park, by T.M. Read, was published in the Minneapolis Journal on August 11, 1930.

But peace still reigns in Loring Park,
O’er swans and ducks and squirrels gray;
O’er tennis court, and shady spots
Where little children love to play
O’er noble trees, and verdure green:
O’er seats on which we sit and dream
Till darkness comes and lights are lit,
And it like fairyland doth seem.

Loring Park by T.M. Read

We’re ending National Poetry month with a poem from the past. This poem about Loring Park, by T.M. Read, was published in the Minneapolis Journal on August 11, 1930.

But peace still reigns in Loring Park,

O’er swans and ducks and squirrels gray;

O’er tennis court, and shady spots

Where little children love to play

O’er noble trees, and verdure green:

O’er seats on which we sit and dream

Till darkness comes and lights are lit,

And it like fairyland doth seem.

Track

Tired? Depressed? radio advertisement

Artist

Minneapolis Public Library

Album

5" reel of ads for KBEM

Are you tired? Depressed?  Beef up your life with a book from your Minneapolis Public Library!

Special Collections continues to digitize a collection of reel tapes that date from the 1970s. These tapes were generated by, what was then, the Minneapolis Public Library. Most of the reels are recordings that were included in the library’s regular weekly program, Bookends.

This particular reel contains spot ads that were intended for broadcast on local Minneapolis radio station, KBEM. The voice you hear is that of station instructor, Warren Christy. Stay tuned for more sound clip highlights from the archive.

My Minneapolis, by Perry Mack
In honor of National Poetry Month, we’re sharing poetry from the past. This poem about Minneapolis, by Perry Mack, was published in the Minneapolis Daily Star on May 11, 1923.

In June I’d like to be,
With you as company
Round Isles or Calhoun,
We’d paddle honeymoon,
While moonbeams shining dance,
On our canoe romance,
Oh, fair-haired city Miss,
My Minneapolis

My Minneapolis, by Perry Mack

In honor of National Poetry Month, we’re sharing poetry from the past. This poem about Minneapolis, by Perry Mack, was published in the Minneapolis Daily Star on May 11, 1923.

In June I’d like to be,

With you as company

Round Isles or Calhoun,

We’d paddle honeymoon,

While moonbeams shining dance,

On our canoe romance,

Oh, fair-haired city Miss,

My Minneapolis

Track

Librarians radio advertisement

Artist

Minneapolis Public Library

Album

5" reel of ads for KBEM

Remember: librarians are very nice people. Visit your Minneapolis Public Library!

Special Collections continues to digitize a collection of reel tapes that date from the 1970s. These tapes were generated by, what was then, the Minneapolis Public Library. Most of the reels are recordings that were included in the library’s regular weekly program, Bookends.

This particular reel contains spot ads that were intended for broadcast on local Minneapolis radio station, KBEM. The voice you hear is that of station instructor, Warren Christy. Stay tuned for more sound clip highlights from the archive.

The Fuller Dymaxion World Map: Minneapolis, Hub of the World for Trade, Business and Travel

"This fundamental fact is worth repetition and emphasis: If you look at my strip map of the world island, concentrating on the North American continent, the most central place you can find is in Minnesota!

"So I say that Minnesota should play a very large role in tomorrow’s swelling world traffic between America, Europe and Asia. It should be possible to establish an entirely new transportation system center in this state. Construction of the Experimental City will give you a perfect opportunity to provide the vital hub for this future transportation system."

- R. Buckminster Fuller, Minneapolis Star, December 7, 1967

Fuller was a creative engineer, architect, inventor, and futurist, famous for his geodesic buildings. In this article, Fuller explained how Minneapolis is the hub of the world in his dymaxion concept.

Minneapolis Industrial Exposition Building

Formerly located at 101 Central Ave Southeast (or as their catalogues would tell you “East End 3rd AVE. BRIDGE”), The Savage Company was the last concern to utilize the 1887 Industrial Exposition Building in its entirety. When the building was purchased for use in bottling Coca-Cola in 1939 the majority of this edifice was torn down, leaving the large tower to stand alone.

The color postcard is postmarked 1904 which would make the view that it depicts to be around the time when M. W. Savage bought the building in 1903. This view is especially dramatic with the foreground dominated by the turbulent majesty of the St. Anthony Falls (though it appears as though some artistic license has been invoked).

The black and white postcard dates from after 1925 when the large, iron signs were installed on the tower. The building had seen many different variations of M. W., and then Erle, Savage’s companies, but this incarnation would be the last. After the Coca-Cola plant was demolished in the 1980s the land became home to residential developments. Both cards reside in the Minneapolis History Collection.

-Ben Heath, Special Collections Intern, Minneapolis Postcard Collection

Frozen Falls

The celebrated falls at Minnehaha Park are largely silent in the winter, though the reported laughing these waters performed during the warmer seasons was just a misunderstanding after all. Of the dozens of postcards of Minnehaha Falls in the Minneapolis History Collection, these few depict the falls as frozen in winter. The two cards with pink captions date from sometime about fifteen years after the lands around the falls were acquired by the Minneapolis park board in 1889. The weirdly tinted tones emphasize the cold white starkness of the curtains of ice. The black & white card at the top presents a view from a little later. The only hints of human activity this image contains are the two rustic bridges that cross above and below Minnehaha Falls. The last card (top right) shows the falls in the 1940s; still frozen and still quiet. That is, until the warmth comes around again.

-Ben Heath, Special Collections Intern, Minneapolis Postcard Collection