Kitty Ging Murder

Kitty Ging Park recently got a mention in the Flanagan Memo.  A softball field near the site of her murder is informally known as Kitty Ging Field.

Kitty Ging was acquainted with Harry T. Hayward and both of them lived in the Ozark Flats apartment building in Minneapolis in 1894.  Harry was a playboy that liked to gamble.  He convinced Kitty to let him put two $5000 life insurance policies on her as an investment.  He also was involved in distributing counterfeit money and promised to get Kitty involved.  He planned to have her killed by convincing her to meet in a remote spot and discuss more about “green goods” (counterfeit money). 

Harry did not plan to do the murder himself, he first asked his brother Ardy and when he declined, Harry convinced Ozark Flats janitor Claus A. Blixt to murder Miss Ging for $2000 of the $10,000 of insurance money.

On December 3, 1894 Blixt drove Miss Ging to the western shore Lake Calhoun and shot her in the head close range.  Her body was thrown back into the buggy and laid still.  Blixt rode for a little longer and then threw her body off the buggy and ran over it.  

On November 30th, Hayward’s brother Ardy had told attorney Levi Stewart about Harry’s plans.  Once he had heard the murder had taken place Stewart contacted the county attorney.  Ardy was arrested and said nothing at first but was confronted by Stewart and confessed the plot.  Blixt and Harry Hayward were charged with murder.  Harry was convicted first because Blixt was needed as the only witness to the crime.   Harry was executed by hanging on December 11, 1895.  Blixt received life imprisonment and died in Stillwater Prison in 1925.

Hayward is buried in Pioneers and Soldiers Memorial Cemetery.

We just added The Ging Murder and the Hayward Trial to the Minneapolis History Collection.  It consists of the official stenographic report supplemented by “A Dramatic Story of the Great Crime” by Oscar F.G. Day.

Munsingwear, Minneapolis September 1964
Information from Susan Marks’ In the Mood for Munsingwear: Known for its undergarments and Penguin bowling and golf shirts, Munsingwear cranked out new designs, new offerings and new innovations throughout the 1960s and 1970s. Sales continued to be healthy in these decades, but earnings were slipping.  Some possible factors for the loss in earnings: “revolving door management,” lack of solid marketing strategies, changes in demand and a more fragmented garment industry. While its competitors moved factories offshore, the Munsingwear factor stayed open until 1981.  Four hundred employees lost their jobs when it closed.  The building is now International Market Square. High-res

Munsingwear, Minneapolis September 1964

Information from Susan Marks’ In the Mood for Munsingwear: Known for its undergarments and Penguin bowling and golf shirts, Munsingwear cranked out new designs, new offerings and new innovations throughout the 1960s and 1970s. Sales continued to be healthy in these decades, but earnings were slipping.  Some possible factors for the loss in earnings: “revolving door management,” lack of solid marketing strategies, changes in demand and a more fragmented garment industry. While its competitors moved factories offshore, the Munsingwear factor stayed open until 1981.  Four hundred employees lost their jobs when it closed.  The building is now International Market Square.

Arch at the entry of Special Collections

This mahogany arch originally served as the fireplace over mantel in the Ladies Reading Room in the Main Library at 10th and Hennepin Avenue that opened in 1889.

In 1960 the arch was relocated to the second Minneapolis Central Library building at 4th and Hennepin Avenue and served as a niche for the Minerva statue (now in the library’s atrium). Since Minneapolis Central opened in 2006 it has served as the entrance for Special Collections.

Gay Vue Magazine, 1971-1972

Gay Vue was one of the earliest LGBT publications in Minneapolis.  Jack Baker was on the board of directors. Sherrie Buffington was co-editor.

You can find Gay Vue and these other early LGBT publications (So’s Your Old Lady, Equal Time, GLC Voice) in the Special Collections Minneapolis periodicals collection. We also have an index to GLC Voice at Special Collections.

The images above are from Volume I, number 2 of Gay Vue, 21 August, 1971.

If you would like to see more early LGBT periodicals and Pride materials, please check out our display in the atrium of Minneapolis Central Library.

Staffelalbum der Herzstaffel, 1943

A German Luftwaffe (air force) unit history chronicling the invasion of the Soviet Union during World War II.  This is from our Kittleson World War II Collection. 

This unit history mostly chronicles the unit’s time in the Ukraine and Russia. It also features candid shots of everyday life of the unit and some photos of the people in the occupied territory. The page above loosely translates to “The country and its inhabitants.”  This unit history only covers the victorious part of the war for the Germans, after 1942 they were fighting a defensive battle against a revived Soviet army that defeated and conquered Germany in 1945.

Hennepin County Fair, 1946
From the September 26, 1946 Minneapolis Times, “The apples probably will be smaller in number, but apparently larger in size if the entry of H.F. Broms, Excelsior, is an example. Trinky Greenhoe, 3, of Hopkins is passing serious judgment on the tasty-looking fruit.” High-res

Hennepin County Fair, 1946

From the September 26, 1946 Minneapolis Times, “The apples probably will be smaller in number, but apparently larger in size if the entry of H.F. Broms, Excelsior, is an example. Trinky Greenhoe, 3, of Hopkins is passing serious judgment on the tasty-looking fruit.”

Hennepin County Fair, 1946
From the September 26, 1946 Minneapolis Times, “The Hennepin county fair grounds at Hopkins was abustle today as exhibitors prepared for the formal opening at 8 p.m….Harold C. Pederson, fair president, shows new types of oats to Bonnie Filas, Camden Station 4-H girl who will exhibit 12 projects.” High-res

Hennepin County Fair, 1946

From the September 26, 1946 Minneapolis Times, “The Hennepin county fair grounds at Hopkins was abustle today as exhibitors prepared for the formal opening at 8 p.m….Harold C. Pederson, fair president, shows new types of oats to Bonnie Filas, Camden Station 4-H girl who will exhibit 12 projects.”

Hennepin County Fair, 1945
From the August 9, 1945 Minneapolis Times,”Rose Clausen, supervisor of the Hennepin County women’s department put the finishing touches on the quilt exhibit before the thirty-ninth annual fair opened this morning for a three-day run. The women’s exhibit is one of many displays and shows at the Hopkins fairgrounds.” High-res

Hennepin County Fair, 1945

From the August 9, 1945 Minneapolis Times,”Rose Clausen, supervisor of the Hennepin County women’s department put the finishing touches on the quilt exhibit before the thirty-ninth annual fair opened this morning for a three-day run. The women’s exhibit is one of many displays and shows at the Hopkins fairgrounds.”