"Anti-Blackout" Flying Suit, Munsingwear, 1945
Caption attached to photo from the Minneapolis Tribune:
THE ANTI-BLACKOUT FLYING SUIT is modeled here by Kenneth R. Larson (center), 5153 Thirtieth avenue S., Munsingwear industrial engineer, and Charles W. Pauly, 165 Peninsula road, Munsingwear mechanical engineer. At right, Frances Balck, 3028 Fremont avenue S., helps zip up the suit for Larson while Pauly “blows up” the gear.
Towards the end of World War II warplanes were getting fast enough to put significant g-forces on the pilots.  G-suits like the one above would allow pilots to stay alert and conscious as the gravity forces would try to force the blood away from the pilot’s head during high-g maneuvers. The g-suit would put pressure on the legs and abdomen, restricting blood flow away from the brain and eliminating the possibility of the pilot “blacking out” during flight. High-res

"Anti-Blackout" Flying Suit, Munsingwear, 1945

Caption attached to photo from the Minneapolis Tribune:

THE ANTI-BLACKOUT FLYING SUIT is modeled here by Kenneth R. Larson (center), 5153 Thirtieth avenue S., Munsingwear industrial engineer, and Charles W. Pauly, 165 Peninsula road, Munsingwear mechanical engineer. At right, Frances Balck, 3028 Fremont avenue S., helps zip up the suit for Larson while Pauly “blows up” the gear.

Towards the end of World War II warplanes were getting fast enough to put significant g-forces on the pilots.  G-suits like the one above would allow pilots to stay alert and conscious as the gravity forces would try to force the blood away from the pilot’s head during high-g maneuvers. The g-suit would put pressure on the legs and abdomen, restricting blood flow away from the brain and eliminating the possibility of the pilot “blacking out” during flight.

Honeywell Diamond Jubilee Game, 1960

For 2 dollars you could get yourself the Honeywell Diamond Jubilee Game in 1960. Game play follows the shape of an H and features a time line with Honeywell and American historical landmarks on most of the playing spaces.  As Honeywell is part of the military-industrial complex, many of the dates highlighted on the timeline relate to U.S. military history and the Cold War.

Honeywell perfected its first thermostat in 1885.  The pink spaces would highlight a “product first” and would allow a player to earn a diamond. The object of the game is to get the finish with three diamonds first.

Another product first - 1906 - clock thermostat (couldn’t have a programmable thermostat without this invention!).

Game play isn’t especially changing and not at all cerebral.  The Honeywell Diamond Jubilee Game is governed by chance, not the choices a player makes.  Unless you land on a “product first” or “direction block” space, you are just waiting for your next turn.  If you do land on a “direction block” space you receive a “profit or loss” card.  These cards may make you go back spaces, go forward spaces or even make you give your hard earned diamonds to someone else.

This is interesting to compare to the bookshelf games series that 3M produced around the same time period.  The very excellent Acquire is probably the most enduring and asks much more of a player than the above Honeywell game does.

thomaslowrysghost:


For the casual fan, the story of the Castaways begins in late 1965 when they broke out regionally, then nationally, and eventually internationally with their hit “Liar, Liar.” They played American Bandstand. They appeared in the movie It’s a Bikini World. For a brief time they, along with the Trashmen, were the most famous musicians in Minnesota.
But as Castaways co-songwriter and singer Jim Donna tells it, their story actually began in the early ’60s when the members of the band were still in high school. Donna still performs as the Castaways to this day (he’s the only founding member still in the group). He’ll bring his band to the Parkway Theater this Saturday night to relive those early days as part of a new series called “Return to Mr. Lucky’s,” which pays tribute to a once-popular teen venue on the corner of Nicollet Ave. and Lake St. in Minneapolis.

(text & image via Local Current Blog)

Mr. Lucky’s was located at 2935 Nicollet Avenue.  In 1919 a brick and concrete garage was built at that address.  It spent some time in the early 1930s as an indoor golf course but by 1933 it was converted into a dance hall.
For decades it was the Friendship Club -a dance club with over 10,000 members by 1951. It was open three nights a week: Thursdays, Saturdays and Sundays.  It did not serve liquor, it served coffee, cookies and 3.2 beer. You also had to be 28 years old or older to be admitted.  It was best known for its “Get Acquainted” dances:
"There are two of them during the evening. The dance lasts for about 20 minute, and stats out with a march which is flolwed by a waltz, a circle two-step and a Paul Jones. You start out with your own partner, Bob blows a whistle. That means all dancing stops for a second or two. The couples promenade in twos, fours, or sixes and then girls step back one partner. The new partners, greet each other, shake hands makes themselves acquainted and the dancing is resumed." - Cedric Adams, Minneapolis Tribune, October 22, 1939.
The Friendship Club closed in 1961.  By 1963 Mr. Lucky’s had opened in the same building.  It was replaced by Magoo’s restaurant in 1966.  The building was torn down in 1977 to make way for the K-Mart parking lot. High-res

thomaslowrysghost:

For the casual fan, the story of the Castaways begins in late 1965 when they broke out regionally, then nationally, and eventually internationally with their hit “Liar, Liar.” They played American Bandstand. They appeared in the movie It’s a Bikini World. For a brief time they, along with the Trashmen, were the most famous musicians in Minnesota.

But as Castaways co-songwriter and singer Jim Donna tells it, their story actually began in the early ’60s when the members of the band were still in high school. Donna still performs as the Castaways to this day (he’s the only founding member still in the group). He’ll bring his band to the Parkway Theater this Saturday night to relive those early days as part of a new series called “Return to Mr. Lucky’s,” which pays tribute to a once-popular teen venue on the corner of Nicollet Ave. and Lake St. in Minneapolis.

(text & image via Local Current Blog)

Mr. Lucky’s was located at 2935 Nicollet Avenue.  In 1919 a brick and concrete garage was built at that address.  It spent some time in the early 1930s as an indoor golf course but by 1933 it was converted into a dance hall.

For decades it was the Friendship Club -a dance club with over 10,000 members by 1951. It was open three nights a week: Thursdays, Saturdays and Sundays.  It did not serve liquor, it served coffee, cookies and 3.2 beer. You also had to be 28 years old or older to be admitted.  It was best known for its “Get Acquainted” dances:

"There are two of them during the evening. The dance lasts for about 20 minute, and stats out with a march which is flolwed by a waltz, a circle two-step and a Paul Jones. You start out with your own partner, Bob blows a whistle. That means all dancing stops for a second or two. The couples promenade in twos, fours, or sixes and then girls step back one partner. The new partners, greet each other, shake hands makes themselves acquainted and the dancing is resumed." - Cedric Adams, Minneapolis Tribune, October 22, 1939.

The Friendship Club closed in 1961.  By 1963 Mr. Lucky’s had opened in the same building.  It was replaced by Magoo’s restaurant in 1966.  The building was torn down in 1977 to make way for the K-Mart parking lot.

pbsthisdayinhistory:

November 28, 1943: Allied Leaders Meet at Tehran Conference
On this day in 1943, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt, Soviet Premier Joseph Stalin, and British Prime Minister Winston Churchill met together for the first time in Tehran, Iran to commit to an eastern front offensive against Nazi Germany and to discuss the plans for postwar Germany. During World War II, Allied leaders had many ways to stay in contact, but there was nothing like meeting in person to ensure that a point was adequately stressed, to forge a friendship, or to understand how to best manipulate the other man. 
Explore WWII: Behind Closed Doors’ World War II conferences timeline, which analyzes in detail the objectives and outcomes of each conference between the Allied leaders.
High-res

pbsthisdayinhistory:

November 28, 1943: Allied Leaders Meet at Tehran Conference

On this day in 1943, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt, Soviet Premier Joseph Stalin, and British Prime Minister Winston Churchill met together for the first time in Tehran, Iran to commit to an eastern front offensive against Nazi Germany and to discuss the plans for postwar Germany.

During World War II, Allied leaders had many ways to stay in contact, but there was nothing like meeting in person to ensure that a point was adequately stressed, to forge a friendship, or to understand how to best manipulate the other man. 

Explore WWII: Behind Closed DoorsWorld War II conferences timeline, which analyzes in detail the objectives and outcomes of each conference between the Allied leaders.

Authors, Reenactor, Archivist and Historian Will Present ‘Minnesotans in the Civil War’ Series at Hennepin County Libraries Beginning Dec. 3 
 Minnesota was far from Civil War battlefields but Minnesotans played significant roles in the fight against the Confederate States’ secession and slavery. To educate area residents about American history on the 150th anniversary of the war, Hennepin County Library will present “Minnesotans in the Civil War,” a free program series, Dec. 3-Feb. 26 at eight libraries. Registration is required.   Programs are “Pale Horse at Plum Run,” “An Interactive Experience,” “Letters From Local Brothers,” and “General William LeDuc.” The programs are funded by Minnesota’s Arts and Cultural Heritage Fund.

Authors, Reenactor, Archivist and Historian Will Present ‘Minnesotans in the Civil War’ Series at Hennepin County Libraries Beginning Dec. 3


Minnesota was far from Civil War battlefields but Minnesotans played significant roles in the fight against the Confederate States’ secession and slavery. To educate area residents about American history on the 150th anniversary of the war, Hennepin County Library will present “Minnesotans in the Civil War,” a free program series, Dec. 3-Feb. 26 at eight libraries. Registration is required.
 
Programs are “Pale Horse at Plum Run,” “An Interactive Experience,” “Letters From Local Brothers,” and “General William LeDuc.” The programs are funded by Minnesota’s Arts and Cultural Heritage Fund.

Mary Moulton Cheney (1871-1957)
Cheney was a Minneapolis artist best known for her graphical designs, such as this illustration for a guest book.  In addition to teaching for nearly 30 years at the Minneapolis School of Fine Arts (which later became the Minneapolis College of Art and Design), Cheney also ran her own print shop (Sign of the Bay Tree) and published books under the name Chemith Press.
Hennepin County Library houses an archival collection on Cheney and currently has a display of her work in the Special Collections department. High-res

Mary Moulton Cheney (1871-1957)

Cheney was a Minneapolis artist best known for her graphical designs, such as this illustration for a guest book.  In addition to teaching for nearly 30 years at the Minneapolis School of Fine Arts (which later became the Minneapolis College of Art and Design), Cheney also ran her own print shop (Sign of the Bay Tree) and published books under the name Chemith Press.

Hennepin County Library houses an archival collection on Cheney and currently has a display of her work in the Special Collections department.

Little War on the Prairie: U.S.-Dakota War 1862 (via Little War on the Prairie | This American Life)
Growing up in Mankato, Minnesota, John Biewen says, nobody ever talked about the most important historical event ever to happen there: in 1862, it was the site of the largest mass execution in U.S. history. Thirty-eight Dakota Indians were hanged after a war with white settlers. John went back to Minnesota to figure out what really happened 150 years ago, and why Minnesotans didn’t talk about it much after. (from This American Life website)
Broadcasting on Minnesota Public Radio:
1 pm, Saturday, November 24
10 pm, Sunday, November 25

Little War on the Prairie: U.S.-Dakota War 1862 (via Little War on the Prairie | This American Life)

Growing up in Mankato, Minnesota, John Biewen says, nobody ever talked about the most important historical event ever to happen there: in 1862, it was the site of the largest mass execution in U.S. history. Thirty-eight Dakota Indians were hanged after a war with white settlers. John went back to Minnesota to figure out what really happened 150 years ago, and why Minnesotans didn’t talk about it much after. (from This American Life website)

Broadcasting on Minnesota Public Radio:

1 pm, Saturday, November 24

10 pm, Sunday, November 25

Traffic on Nicollet Avenue to view the Christmas decorations on Thanksgiving Day, 1937
Today the annual tradition of allowing automobiles on Nicollet Mall for one day each year returns from 6-10 pm.  Cars can enter and exit on Washington Avenue or Grant Street and there is a 10 mph speed limit. High-res

Traffic on Nicollet Avenue to view the Christmas decorations on Thanksgiving Day, 1937

Today the annual tradition of allowing automobiles on Nicollet Mall for one day each year returns from 6-10 pm.  Cars can enter and exit on Washington Avenue or Grant Street and there is a 10 mph speed limit.

Nicollet Ave Repaving — Our Story So Far 5/7/12-8/31/12 Minneapolis, MN (by BaronDave007)

Dave Romm, who lives near the intersection of Nicollet and 31st made this video to document the work being done on Nicollet Avenue this past summer.  The avenue was getting it first total repaving since 1954, the last year of the streetcar system. 

This part of Nicollet Avenue was home to the Twin City Rapid Transit streetcar barn and the Nicollet Baseball Park.  Remnants of the streetcar line and the old street surface are also documented by Romm on Facebook.