Museum on the Streets - Lake Street was unveiled on September 25!

We were lucky to attend the grand unveiling of the Museum on the Streets - Lake Street earlier this week.  It consists of walking tours with signs along Lake Street in three separate areas: Uptown, Midtown, and 27th and Lake.

The Uptown Tour, focused on the lake district has 19 stops that go from Hove’s/Lunds grocery store at 1450 West Lake Street to the Schatzlien Saddle Shop at 609 West Lake Street.

The Midtown Tour is focused on the immigrants that have lived there past and present has 18 stops that go from Park Avenue Residential District to Layman’s Cemetary.

The 27th and Lake Tour is focused on transportation and industry has 19 stops, going from  Porky’s Drive-In at 2017 East Lake Street to Wonderland Amusement Park (East Lake and 31st Ave. S.)

Joyce Wisdom from the Lake Street Council (and a star of the Special Collections Documentary) addressed the crowd as did Mayor Rybak, County Commissioner Gail Dorfman, County Commissioner Peter McLaughlin and others.

Here is a MinnPost article on the new signs.

stuffaboutminneapolis:

This Day In Minneapolis History - Old Main ruins after the fire on September 24, 1904
Old Main The University’s first permanent building, Old Main, was erected in 1858 in the area now known as the knoll.
Six months after Old Main opened in 1858, hard economic times after the Panic of 1857 and the impending Civil War forced the school to close. Old Main became a refuge for squatters. A legislative committee that visited the building found a family living in it. The family became surly at having their privacy invaded. Turkeys were in one room, hay in another, and wood-splitting had ruined the floor in the central hall.
In 1867 the legislature voted $15,000 to repair the building and begin instruction in it. The governor signed this act, reorganizing the University, in February 1868.
Old Main was destroyed by fire Sept. 24, 1904. A plaque in front of Shevlin Hall on Pillsbury Drive marks the site of Old Main’s front door.
Photo via the Minnesota Historical Society, information found at University of Minnesota website.

Here are two drawings of Old Main from our Minneapolis Photo Database.
1879
1886 High-res

stuffaboutminneapolis:

This Day In Minneapolis History - Old Main ruins after the fire on September 24, 1904

Old Main The University’s first permanent building, Old Main, was erected in 1858 in the area now known as the knoll.

Six months after Old Main opened in 1858, hard economic times after the Panic of 1857 and the impending Civil War forced the school to close. Old Main became a refuge for squatters. A legislative committee that visited the building found a family living in it. The family became surly at having their privacy invaded. Turkeys were in one room, hay in another, and wood-splitting had ruined the floor in the central hall.

In 1867 the legislature voted $15,000 to repair the building and begin instruction in it. The governor signed this act, reorganizing the University, in February 1868.

Old Main was destroyed by fire Sept. 24, 1904. A plaque in front of Shevlin Hall on Pillsbury Drive marks the site of Old Main’s front door.

Photo via the Minnesota Historical Society, information found at University of Minnesota website.

Here are two drawings of Old Main from our Minneapolis Photo Database.

1879

1886

Apology to Stuff about Minneapolis about his experience in Special Collections

We were sad to see this posted yesterday by stuffaboutminneapolis, our favorite tumblr:

Paul, have you actually been to the historical society on the 4th floor of the central library? I was there a couple weeks ago helping my friend pinpoint the year of this postcard he has of Nicollet Park. But it’s so fascinating and I could get lost in there forever, with all the directories and maps and archives they have. I’ve been using the microfilm incessantly too, and this is just for some 2002/03 Twins stuff and between my friend and I, we’ve probably spent at least 8 hours on it.

Yes. I was there a few months ago, I walked in and the librarian asked if I needed help, I said no, I’m just looking around, and she told me this isn’t where you “just look around”, you need to have a reason to come in here. I said “I’ve never been here, not sure what I what to look up”. She said, “that’s what the main library is for, you need to be here for a reason”. So, long story short…I rolled my eyes and left.

True story.

Here is the response we just sent to Paul:

Paul,

We are profoundly sorry you had an unsatisfactory experience in Special Collections.  In the last year we have been liberalizing our policies due to changing circumstances in the reading room.  We have eliminated the need to register, make an appointment for most materials and have opened up areas of the reading room to browsing (Kittleson WWII, city directories, card catalog, etc.).  This is a big culture change from how we have been doing things for the last six years.  Due to security and staffing issues when Special Collections re-opened in the new Minneapolis Central Library in 2006, we were required to severely curtail service to walk-in patrons and researchers that wanted to browse the collection.

We now have a different staffing model and our rare 19th Century Collection has been moved out of the reading room into the Special Collections vault where it belongs. Instead of registering patrons, we now only hold Library Card/ID for high school yearbooks and vault materials.  We also have moved our heavily used collections into the reading room.  If a patron wants something paged from the vault we still ask them to notify us prior to visiting but for the most part we can get a researcher started on their project when they come through our door.

 Your experience reminds us we need to more uniformly explain our new policies to all our visitors so we can emphasize the more welcoming environment we are endeavoring to establish. 

Our sincerest apologies,

Special Collections

Twin Cities R&B: Lost, found and funky(via Twin Cities R&B: Lost, found and funky | StarTribune.com)
We enjoyed the preview tracks that were played on the Current in anticipation of Secret Stash Records release of Twin Cities Funk & Soul: Lost R&B Grooves From Minneapolis/St. Paul 1964-1979.
Another great resource that covers this “lost era” of Minneapolis music is Connie’s Insider, which provides concert listings and reviews from the 1970s.  It is available for viewing at Special Collections.
There is an in-store event with the Valdons tomorrow at Fifth Element to celebrate the release of the compilation. 

Twin Cities R&B: Lost, found and funky(via Twin Cities R&B: Lost, found and funky | StarTribune.com)

We enjoyed the preview tracks that were played on the Current in anticipation of Secret Stash Records release of Twin Cities Funk & Soul: Lost R&B Grooves From Minneapolis/St. Paul 1964-1979.

Another great resource that covers this “lost era” of Minneapolis music is Connie’s Insider, which provides concert listings and reviews from the 1970s.  It is available for viewing at Special Collections.

There is an in-store event with the Valdons tomorrow at Fifth Element to celebrate the release of the compilation. 

Dayton Bros. Who Own Bachelor Farmer Buy 2nd North Loop Bldg.
(via Twin Cities Business - Dayton Bros. Who Own Bachelor Farmer Buy 2nd North Loop Bldg.)
The building’s historic name was the Hennepin Hotel but it also has been known as the Boarman & Associates building. It’s address has been known as 204, 206 and 208 North 1st Street. It is a three story brick and stone building with a four bay facade. Its principal design feature is series of segmented arches with raised hoods executed in the Queen Anne style (this information is from the National Register of Historic Places application for the warehouse district).
The architecture is attributed to Frank B. Hart. He was the partner of Joseph H. Seymour in the buillding firm of Seymour and Hart. They also built the Bradsteet, Thurber and Company furniture factory at 513-515 Nicollet Avenue in 1889.

Dayton Bros. Who Own Bachelor Farmer Buy 2nd North Loop Bldg.

(via Twin Cities Business - Dayton Bros. Who Own Bachelor Farmer Buy 2nd North Loop Bldg.)

The building’s historic name was the Hennepin Hotel but it also has been known as the Boarman & Associates building. It’s address has been known as 204, 206 and 208 North 1st Street. It is a three story brick and stone building with a four bay facade. Its principal design feature is series of segmented arches with raised hoods executed in the Queen Anne style (this information is from the National Register of Historic Places application for the warehouse district).

The architecture is attributed to Frank B. Hart. He was the partner of Joseph H. Seymour in the buillding firm of Seymour and Hart. They also built the Bradsteet, Thurber and Company furniture factory at 513-515 Nicollet Avenue in 1889.

Introducing…Hennepin County Library’s Special Collections (by hclib)

In anticipation of the premiere of the TPT documentary on Special Collections (Sunday, September 16 at 8 pm on the TPT MN Channel) we are debuting three short videos that were made in concert with the documentary.  A video on the WWII posters will debut tomorrow and a video on house history research will debut on Sunday.

Chip Schilling’s Agents of Change

We just recently ordered this book about the culling of the urban forest by book artist Chip Schilling.  The photos above are of the exhibit that was done in conjunction with the book release by Schilling and David Pitman.

Schilling’s work is currently on exhibit at the Cargill Gallery on the 2nd floor of Minneapolis Central Library as part of a celebration of the first five years of the Minnesota Book Artist award. There is an opening reception this evening from 6-8 pm.

We also have books created by Regula Russelle, Jody Williams and Schilling available for viewing in Special Collections if you want to stop by when we are open (Monday-Thursday and first and third Saturdays, 10-4:30 pm).