Gay Vue Magazine, 1971-1972

Gay Vue was one of the earliest LGBT publications in Minneapolis.  Jack Baker was on the board of directors. Sherrie Buffington was co-editor.

You can find Gay Vue and these other early LGBT publications (So’s Your Old Lady, Equal Time, GLC Voice) in the Special Collections Minneapolis periodicals collection. We also have an index to GLC Voice at Special Collections.

The images above are from Volume I, number 2 of Gay Vue, 21 August, 1971.

If you would like to see more early LGBT periodicals and Pride materials, please check out our display in the atrium of Minneapolis Central Library.

Staffelalbum der Herzstaffel, 1943

A German Luftwaffe (air force) unit history chronicling the invasion of the Soviet Union during World War II.  This is from our Kittleson World War II Collection. 

This unit history mostly chronicles the unit’s time in the Ukraine and Russia. It also features candid shots of everyday life of the unit and some photos of the people in the occupied territory. The page above loosely translates to “The country and its inhabitants.”  This unit history only covers the victorious part of the war for the Germans, after 1942 they were fighting a defensive battle against a revived Soviet army that defeated and conquered Germany in 1945.

Hennepin County Fair, 1946
From the September 26, 1946 Minneapolis Times, “The apples probably will be smaller in number, but apparently larger in size if the entry of H.F. Broms, Excelsior, is an example. Trinky Greenhoe, 3, of Hopkins is passing serious judgment on the tasty-looking fruit.” High-res

Hennepin County Fair, 1946

From the September 26, 1946 Minneapolis Times, “The apples probably will be smaller in number, but apparently larger in size if the entry of H.F. Broms, Excelsior, is an example. Trinky Greenhoe, 3, of Hopkins is passing serious judgment on the tasty-looking fruit.”

Hennepin County Fair, 1946
From the September 26, 1946 Minneapolis Times, “The Hennepin county fair grounds at Hopkins was abustle today as exhibitors prepared for the formal opening at 8 p.m….Harold C. Pederson, fair president, shows new types of oats to Bonnie Filas, Camden Station 4-H girl who will exhibit 12 projects.” High-res

Hennepin County Fair, 1946

From the September 26, 1946 Minneapolis Times, “The Hennepin county fair grounds at Hopkins was abustle today as exhibitors prepared for the formal opening at 8 p.m….Harold C. Pederson, fair president, shows new types of oats to Bonnie Filas, Camden Station 4-H girl who will exhibit 12 projects.”

Hennepin County Fair, 1945
From the August 9, 1945 Minneapolis Times,”Rose Clausen, supervisor of the Hennepin County women’s department put the finishing touches on the quilt exhibit before the thirty-ninth annual fair opened this morning for a three-day run. The women’s exhibit is one of many displays and shows at the Hopkins fairgrounds.” High-res

Hennepin County Fair, 1945

From the August 9, 1945 Minneapolis Times,”Rose Clausen, supervisor of the Hennepin County women’s department put the finishing touches on the quilt exhibit before the thirty-ninth annual fair opened this morning for a three-day run. The women’s exhibit is one of many displays and shows at the Hopkins fairgrounds.”

stuffaboutminneapolis:

Fruen Mill Minneapolis by Telegraph Studios

These are some haunting images from the once vibrant Fruen Mill in Minneapolis, MN. The crumbling brick, rusting metal and aging graffiti can’t hide the small spots of life as foliage grows up through the ruins.


Fruen Mill started grinding grain by water power on Bassett’s Creek in 1894. The original workshop was built in 1872 - William H. Fruen originally manufactured screws and waterwheel governors in his workshop, which burned with the original mill in 1920.  A more modern cereal mill powered by diesel (1916) survived the fire. The structures in the video above were mostly built after 1920.  The Fruen company was the first manufacturer of table cereals (Pettijohn Breakfast food) in Minneapolis. The milling company was sold to ConAgra in 1971.

The vacant mill has been a dangerous place for tresspassers: Ron Block of Burnsville died there after a fall in 2006. A year before an 18 year old Robbinsdale man survived a 70 foot fall on the property.

Glenwood Inglewood Company, and located near the Fruen mill also founded in 1894, was owned by 4 generations of the Fruen family until 1990, when it was sold to Deep Rock Company.

Lilac Park

A nice rest stop off the Cedar Lake bike trail connecting Minneapolis and Hopkins. There once were many other rest stops built along Lilac Way (Highway 100) which was a WPA project during the Depression.

The beehive fireplace and table were taken from Lilac Park near Minnetonka Boulevard and placed at Roadside (now Lilac) Park.  The original park near Minnetonka Boulevard is scheduled for demolition when highway 100 is widened in 2017.  St. Louis Park used to have three Lilac Way parks: Roadside (renamed and restored), Lilac (salvaged) and Excelsior (already lost to road construction).

Graeser Park in Robbinsdale is the other remaining Lilac Way park, complete with it’s own beehive.  There have been prelimary plans to preserve it.

From W.P.A. Accomplishments in Minneapolis:BELT LINE HIGHWAY: WPA labor was employed on this interlacing super-highway, which crosses 9 highways or arterial streets and includes five railway grade separations and two arterial highway separations of clover-leaf type. It provides a sixty-foot main highway 66 miles long, flanked on each side by walks and service drives. This traffic artery enables motorists from the west to enter the heart of Minneapolis at the most advantageous point, with minimum confusion and maximum safety.