Hennepin County Library

Jul 27

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Jul 25

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Jul 23

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Jul 21

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Jul 19

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Jul 17

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Jul 15

The View from the Laurel Avenue Bridge, 1941
From the late 19th century and through much of the 20th, the low areas north of the Warehouse district and spreading westward past Kenwood towards Cedar Lake were a busy, crowded mass of railroad tracks, as can be glimpsed in the photo above. The old Laurel Avenue Bridge spanned the yards from the Bryn Mawr neighborhood into downtown.  
Both the bridge and many of the tracks were torn out in the 1970s as the area was converted into a maze of freeway bridges and overpasses. The recently completed Van White Bridge is the first to span that area since the removal of the Laurel Ave bridge. 
Only a single set of railroad tracks passes through what is now used for bicycle trails and the City’s public works facilities, branching into two tracks as it passes Kenwood. As Louis D. Johnston points out in a recent MinnPost article, this railroad corridor has long been a source of controversy and, despite the huge reduction in rail traffic, disagreements continue to this day in the shape of the current SWLRT debate.   
Photo from the Marvin Juell collection, Hennepin County Library Special Collections

The View from the Laurel Avenue Bridge, 1941

From the late 19th century and through much of the 20th, the low areas north of the Warehouse district and spreading westward past Kenwood towards Cedar Lake were a busy, crowded mass of railroad tracks, as can be glimpsed in the photo above. The old Laurel Avenue Bridge spanned the yards from the Bryn Mawr neighborhood into downtown.  

Both the bridge and many of the tracks were torn out in the 1970s as the area was converted into a maze of freeway bridges and overpasses. The recently completed Van White Bridge is the first to span that area since the removal of the Laurel Ave bridge. 

Only a single set of railroad tracks passes through what is now used for bicycle trails and the City’s public works facilities, branching into two tracks as it passes Kenwood. As Louis D. Johnston points out in a recent MinnPost article, this railroad corridor has long been a source of controversy and, despite the huge reduction in rail traffic, disagreements continue to this day in the shape of the current SWLRT debate.   

Photo from the Marvin Juell collection, Hennepin County Library Special Collections

Jul 12

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Jul 10

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Jul 07

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