Hennepin County Library

Aug 28

Hans Weyandt, writer in residence at Minneapolis Central,  sits down with our Special Collections Librarian (and curator of this Tumblr). Part I of II.
chpinthestacks:

CHP In the Stacks: An Interview with Bailey Diers, Hennepin County Library’s Special Collections Librarian (Part 1)
How many years have you worked in this collection?3 years, full-time for the past 15 months.What is the focus of your collection?
Special Collections houses six collections, the largest and most heavily used being the Minneapolis History Collection, one of the area’s best local history resources. The collection contains historic and current materials related to the city including more than 300 archival and manuscript collections, thousands of files of newspaper clippings, maps, photographs, postcards, yearbooks, periodicals, and more.Our other collections are primarily rare book collections, though several also include manuscripts and other primary documents: Kittleson World War II Collection, Huttner Abolition and Anti-Slavery Collection, Nineteenth Century American Studies Collection, Hoag Mark Twain Collection, and the Fine Press and Book Arts Collection.
Who is the primary patron of your collection? How do they use your collection?We’re a public library so our patron base is broad. Regular repeat patrons include historical researchers, historical preservationists, and city planners, who primarily research buildings, businesses, people, and neighborhoods. High school and college students often use our collection for local history courses and projects. And many of our walk-ins are members of the general public seeking information on their home, family, business, or any number of random topics.What are some of the more unique items in your collection?Our archival collections contain some of the most unique material in our collections—hundreds of menus from Minneapolis restaurants from the 1800s to today, the late 19th century diaries of a young boy named Ezra Fitch Pabody, thousands of early 20th century political cartoons by Charles Bartholomew, original music manuscripts by local conductors and composers, hundreds of thousands of photographs of the city of Minneapolis—the list goes on.If you could lock the doors and spend a whole day just browsing for yourself, what would you look for? What books interest you the most?
I would like to spend time digging through the more personal items in our archival collections—the handwritten diaries and correspondence documenting the often trivial happenings of daily life in an earlier Minneapolis and the scrapbooks bursting at the seams with news clippings, theater programs, photographs, and personal mementos. These days, so much personal information is online, available for the world to see. When the scrapbooks and diaries in our collection were created many decades ago, their creators likely never imagined the content could one day be made public, so who knows what secrets they hold!Hans Weyandt is currently a writer-in-residence at the Central branch of the Hennepin County Library. Join us Thursday, September 18th at 6:15 pm for a tour of the collection and a conversation with Hans and Bailey. Visit our Facebook event page for more info.  

Hans Weyandt, writer in residence at Minneapolis Central,  sits down with our Special Collections Librarian (and curator of this Tumblr). Part I of II.

chpinthestacks:

CHP In the Stacks: An Interview with Bailey Diers, Hennepin County Library’s Special Collections Librarian (Part 1)

How many years have you worked in this collection?

3 years, full-time for the past 15 months.

What is the focus of your collection?

Special Collections houses six collections, the largest and most heavily used being the Minneapolis History Collection, one of the area’s best local history resources. The collection contains historic and current materials related to the city including more than 300 archival and manuscript collections, thousands of files of newspaper clippings, maps, photographs, postcards, yearbooks, periodicals, and more.

Our other collections are primarily rare book collections, though several also include manuscripts and other primary documents: Kittleson World War II Collection, Huttner Abolition and Anti-Slavery Collection, Nineteenth Century American Studies Collection, Hoag Mark Twain Collection, and the Fine Press and Book Arts Collection.

Who is the primary patron of your collection? How do they use your collection?

We’re a public library so our patron base is broad. Regular repeat patrons include historical researchers, historical preservationists, and city planners, who primarily research buildings, businesses, people, and neighborhoods. High school and college students often use our collection for local history courses and projects. And many of our walk-ins are members of the general public seeking information on their home, family, business, or any number of random topics.

What are some of the more unique items in your collection?

Our archival collections contain some of the most unique material in our collections—hundreds of menus from Minneapolis restaurants from the 1800s to today, the late 19th century diaries of a young boy named Ezra Fitch Pabody, thousands of early 20th century political cartoons by Charles Bartholomew, original music manuscripts by local conductors and composers, hundreds of thousands of photographs of the city of Minneapolis—the list goes on.

If you could lock the doors and spend a whole day just browsing for yourself, what would you look for? What books interest you the most?

I would like to spend time digging through the more personal items in our archival collections—the handwritten diaries and correspondence documenting the often trivial happenings of daily life in an earlier Minneapolis and the scrapbooks bursting at the seams with news clippings, theater programs, photographs, and personal mementos. These days, so much personal information is online, available for the world to see. When the scrapbooks and diaries in our collection were created many decades ago, their creators likely never imagined the content could one day be made public, so who knows what secrets they hold!


Hans Weyandt is currently a writer-in-residence at the Central branch of the Hennepin County Library. Join us Thursday, September 18th at 6:15 pm for a tour of the collection and a conversation with Hans and Bailey. Visit our Facebook event page for more info.  

Aug 27

Crowds outside the State Fair Grandstand, 1900 
The State Fair of 1900 was decidedly different from the State Fair of today. Gambling and alcoholic drinks were prohibited, meals were provided by church and social groups, and it is almost certain that not a single one of those meals was deep-fried or on a stick.
What did 25 cents buy for the average fair-goer back in the day? In the year this photo was taken, visitors could expect to see not only such State Fair standbys as livestock exhibitions, carousel rides, and fireworks, but also some types of attractions which have since fallen out of favor—for example, conjoined twins Millie and Christine McCoy, and an anonymous “ossified man” (likely an individual with fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva, a rare connective tissue disease that causes severe bone overgrowth).  
Crafts such as tapestries and china painting and homemade pickles and preserves were on offer in the Woman’s Building, which purported to showcase “everything dear to the feminine heart.” The fireworks display offered a touch of recent history, with a re-enactment of the American conquest of the Philippines. Many of the re-enactors were Twin Cities military men who had actually served in the Philippines—as the Tribune put it, “the display probably comes closer to ‘the real thing’ than any other exhibition of its kind.”
The current State Fair may not offer a fireworks-laden re-enactment of an incredibly brutal recent war, but there are bacon-wrapped turkey legs and fried chicken served in a waffle cone. Public library patrons who show their library card at the fair today (August 27, 2014) receive discounted admission.
Photograph by Edward A. Bromley, scanned from glass plate negative.
____________
This post was written by Special Collections intern Helen Walden-Fodge. Helen has been working with several archival collections this summer, including the Bromley glass plate negative collection.

Crowds outside the State Fair Grandstand, 1900 

The State Fair of 1900 was decidedly different from the State Fair of today. Gambling and alcoholic drinks were prohibited, meals were provided by church and social groups, and it is almost certain that not a single one of those meals was deep-fried or on a stick.

What did 25 cents buy for the average fair-goer back in the day? In the year this photo was taken, visitors could expect to see not only such State Fair standbys as livestock exhibitions, carousel rides, and fireworks, but also some types of attractions which have since fallen out of favor—for example, conjoined twins Millie and Christine McCoy, and an anonymous “ossified man” (likely an individual with fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva, a rare connective tissue disease that causes severe bone overgrowth). 

Crafts such as tapestries and china painting and homemade pickles and preserves were on offer in the Woman’s Building, which purported to showcase “everything dear to the feminine heart.” The fireworks display offered a touch of recent history, with a re-enactment of the American conquest of the Philippines. Many of the re-enactors were Twin Cities military men who had actually served in the Philippines—as the Tribune put it, “the display probably comes closer to ‘the real thing’ than any other exhibition of its kind.”

The current State Fair may not offer a fireworks-laden re-enactment of an incredibly brutal recent war, but there are bacon-wrapped turkey legs and fried chicken served in a waffle cone. Public library patrons who show their library card at the fair today (August 27, 2014) receive discounted admission.

Photograph by Edward A. Bromley, scanned from glass plate negative.

____________

This post was written by Special Collections intern Helen Walden-Fodge. Helen has been working with several archival collections this summer, including the Bromley glass plate negative collection.

Aug 26

History of Brooklyn Park Library
Brooklyn Park Library opened to the public for business on April 26, 1976, with a ribbon cutting ceremony and official opening on May 5. Due to significant carpet installation problems which required resolution the official dedication was delayed to September 26.
U. S. Congressman William Frenzel was the featured speaker at the dedication and music was provided by the Park Center High School Band and the North Hennepin Senior Citizens Chorus.  
A unique feature of the library - a time capsule on permanent display in the library’s community room - was sponsored by the Brooklyn Park Bicentennial Commission.  Planned contents were taped interviews with some of the city’s older residents, a Bicentennial plate, current newspapers and photographs and predictions for the future made by both local and national officials. 
With the opening of the library, the dozens of bookmobile routes which crisscrossed Brooklyn Park, were phased out.  Some of the stops, such as the one at the Tessman farm, had been in operation for decades. The Thursday night stop at the Zanebrook Shopping Center had been one of the busiest in the county. 
The Library enhanced community service by forging a close working relationship with nearby North Hennepin Community College.  Brooklyn Park’s periodical collection was selected to complement the college library’s periodical collection. The two libraries also consulted when planning Brooklyn Park’s audio-visual collection.  This cooperation included programming with a short course in children’s literature offered by North Hennepin Community College at the Brooklyn Park Library on several occasions.
The opening day collection contained 50,000 books plus newspapers, magazines, pamphlets and art reproductions. Print and audio-visual materials were intershelved and numerous multi-purpose listening centers were located throughout the library for radio, cassettes, records or cartridges using individual headsets.
After the 1999 renovation, the collection held 63,000 books, DVDs, and CDs as well as 46 public access computers.   The first Kid Links was opened on September 9, 1999.  In 2005 more than 430,000 items were checked out – almost twice as many as the opening year of 1976.  The Metropolitan Council projected a population increase of 20% from 2000 to 2020 (from 67,388 to 80,500) and county demographers projected that more than 5800 jobs will be added. A new library will be built in 2014 to meet the expected increase in demand.

History of Brooklyn Park Library

Brooklyn Park Library opened to the public for business on April 26, 1976, with a ribbon cutting ceremony and official opening on May 5. Due to significant carpet installation problems which required resolution the official dedication was delayed to September 26.

U. S. Congressman William Frenzel was the featured speaker at the dedication and music was provided by the Park Center High School Band and the North Hennepin Senior Citizens Chorus. 

A unique feature of the library - a time capsule on permanent display in the library’s community room - was sponsored by the Brooklyn Park Bicentennial Commission.  Planned contents were taped interviews with some of the city’s older residents, a Bicentennial plate, current newspapers and photographs and predictions for the future made by both local and national officials. 

With the opening of the library, the dozens of bookmobile routes which crisscrossed Brooklyn Park, were phased out.  Some of the stops, such as the one at the Tessman farm, had been in operation for decades. The Thursday night stop at the Zanebrook Shopping Center had been one of the busiest in the county. 

The Library enhanced community service by forging a close working relationship with nearby North Hennepin Community College.  Brooklyn Park’s periodical collection was selected to complement the college library’s periodical collection. The two libraries also consulted when planning Brooklyn Park’s audio-visual collection.  This cooperation included programming with a short course in children’s literature offered by North Hennepin Community College at the Brooklyn Park Library on several occasions.

The opening day collection contained 50,000 books plus newspapers, magazines, pamphlets and art reproductions. Print and audio-visual materials were intershelved and numerous multi-purpose listening centers were located throughout the library for radio, cassettes, records or cartridges using individual headsets.

After the 1999 renovation, the collection held 63,000 books, DVDs, and CDs as well as 46 public access computers.   The first Kid Links was opened on September 9, 1999.  In 2005 more than 430,000 items were checked out – almost twice as many as the opening year of 1976.  The Metropolitan Council projected a population increase of 20% from 2000 to 2020 (from 67,388 to 80,500) and county demographers projected that more than 5800 jobs will be added. A new library will be built in 2014 to meet the expected increase in demand.

In The Stacks with Hans Weyandt: -

chpinthestacks:

One happy surprise of my time spent in Hennepin County Library’s Special Collections is how it has bled into other parts of my life.

By extension, I am riding the light-rail more frequently than normal. I get on at the 46th St. station and exit at Nicollet Mall. Less than a five minute walk and…

Digging through the collections for amazing books about books!

Join us Thursday, September 18th at 6:15 pm for a tour of the collection and a conversation with Hans. Visit the Facebook event page for more info.

Aug 23

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Aug 21

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Aug 18

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Aug 15

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Aug 13

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