Library Daily Happenings: Walker Library

May 5, 1936: “In April, Walker Branch again had a large gain in circulation, but more significant was the increase in the number of cards issued — nearly fifty percent more than in 1935. The number of new people coming in is decidedly noticeable. Many are new-comers to the city. It is interesting to take their applications, and to get something of their backgrounds at the time. One night I waited on a pleasant family who had recently arrived from Boston. Their accent sounded almost foreign coming over our desk. The people in a place like this are usually so much more interesting than the books that I wonder we don’t call ourselves ‘popularians’ instead of ‘librarians.’”

Minneapolis Public Library Daily Happenings were recorded by branch managing librarians and submitted in monthly reports. Read more library stories from the MPL archive in Special Collections.

This week is National Library Week (April 13-19). Hennepin County Library invites you, our patrons, to share how library services, spaces, and staff support YOU! Post to Tumblr, or visit us on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and Google+ to share your stories using the hashtag #myHCL.

A new Walker Library will open on Saturday, April 26 at 9 a.m.

Library Daily Happenings: Roosevelt Library

April, 1936:Every two weeks, Miss Young changes the books in the display windows beside the door. She does it with much enthusiasm for she enjoys the colorful book jackets and would like to read every one of the books.”

January, 1938:Notwithstanding all the cold weather, the circulation at Roosevelt Branch has been very good. The patrons who did come to the library took out books for all the family. I never have seen such a parade of small boys loaded with large paper sacks of books.”

April, 1953: “One man wanted to get some ‘fresh ideas on making a speech.’ When he returned the books he had borrowed, I asked him whether he had given the speech. Yes, he had and had won first place!”

April 1960: “We received a lovely azalea plant this month from one of our patrons for, as she said, ‘always coming through with the answer.’”

Minneapolis Public Library Daily Happenings were recorded by branch managing librarians and submitted in monthly reports. Read more library stories from the MPL archive in Special Collections.

This week is National Library Week (April 13-19). Hennepin County Library invites you, our patrons, to share how library services, spaces, and staff support YOU! Post to Tumblr, or visit us on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and Google+ to share your stories using the hashtag #myHCL.

Jody Williams: Books and Artists’ Books

Seven books in the Fine Press and Book Arts Collection at HCL are the fine work of artist Jody Williams, prolific publisher of artists’ books under the imprint Flying Paper Press. Williams received the inaugural Minnesota Book Artist Award in 2008, and in 2013 she was awarded a Minnesota State Arts Board Artist Initiative Grant.

Hear from this award winning artist about how the importance of libraries, books, and research has influenced her work and passion for making books, presented by the Minneapolis Institute of Arts Library.

Saturday, April 19, 11a.m.

Minneapolis Institute of Arts, Friends Community Room

$10; $5 for MIA members; Free for members of the Library Affinity Group. To reserve tickets, call (612) 870-6323 or go to https://tickets.artsmia.org/public/default.asp

That Was Then…This Is Now

With the Minneapolis St. Paul International Film Festival in full swing, we’ve got our minds on movies—movies filmed in the Twin Cities, to be exact!

The stills above are part of a press packet from the movie “That Was Then…This Is Now”, which was filmed in Minneapolis and St. Paul in 1984. The movie, based on the best-selling young adult novel by S.E. Hinton and starring Emilio Estevez, Craig Sheffer, Kim Delaney, and Morgan Freeman, among others, was shot using a wide variety of locations from Washington High School in St. Paul, to the river flats at the University of Minnesota.

Facts from the press packet (available in the Special Collections vertical files):

  • Shooting began August 20, 1984 and was to be completed in 6 weeks.
  • A bit of Hollywood magic was needed to transform Nicollet Island’s Marvel Foods Warehouse into an abandoned crash pad for bums and other unsavory characters.
  • The Minnesota Historical Society doubled for the State Reformatory.
  • A popular St. Paul bar, Spanky’s Saloon, was dressed to become “Charlie’s Bar”. Following the shooting, the owner nicknamed the saloon “Spanky’s of Hollywood.”
  • For high school dance sequences, over 300 students volunteered as extras to dance in a Wednesday night shooting—they were asked to return Thursday and Friday, undaunted and ready to keep dancing, even without music (so as not to interfere with dialogue). They were rewarded with a live band brought in to set the tone for the break and slam dancers.
  • The cast experienced a true Minnesota summer, with daytime highs of 95 degrees and late night lows of 33.

Check out the movie from HCL to see what other local sights you can spot. For recent films made and/or filmed in Minnesota, check out the MN Made lineup at MSPIFF, April 3-19, 2014

Thanks, stuffaboutminneapolis and thomaslowrysghost for the Tumblr suggestion!

chpinthestacks:

Hennepin County Library’s Writers in the Library series and CHP In The Stacks: A Writers and Readers Library Residency Program have teamed up to bring artist and writer Andy Sturdevant to Hennepin County Library – Northeast as a resident.

The author of Potluck Supper with Meeting to Follow (Coffee House Press, 2013), Sturdevant is Artist Resources Director at Springboard for the Arts in Lowertown St. Paul. Potluck Supper was praised as “inquisitive, witty and intelligent” (Star Tribune) and a “guidebook to the Twin Cities spaces, art, and culture… a smart and quirky read” (City Pages) following its publication in October of 2013.

Since moving to Minneapolis in 2005, Sturdevant has become an integral part of the Twin Cities arts community, presenting a myriad of projects, including the annual Soap Factory series “Common Room”, and Salon Saloon, a live-action arts magazine. Sturdevant’s performances and interactions have explored history, place, and memory, and often invite the viewer to take part in the experience by adding his or her own knowledge.

As a writer-in-residence, Sturdevant will work with the materials, the space, and the resources available in the library to help develop new and existing art projects.

“Libraries have always been a very important part of how I work,” said Sturdevant. “Many of my projects have gotten their start at Hennepin County libraries. It’s an honor to be asked to come to Northeast Library to create new ones.”

“This spring, Hennepin County Library – Northeast will truly become a hub for the artists who live and create work in the neighborhood,” said Johannah Genett, Senior Librarian. “Northeast Library is hosting Work of Art, a series of business classes for artists. We are also installing a new art piece in the library. We are looking forward to hosting Andy. We think his residency will help shed light on the ways public libraries can enrich the lives of artists and performers.”

Save the Date: Sturdevant will give a public presentation and present new public project ideas developed during his time as a resident in Northeast Library on Wednesday, May 28th at 6:30pm.

Preserving the History of Music

Last May, the Library was contacted by an English Handel scholar regarding a handwritten note in a 1776 5-volume set entitled A General History of the Science and Practice of Music by Sir John Hawkins. The set was purchased some time ago for the Library by the Minneapolis Athenaeum and contains several handwritten notes, which expand on the content of the original work, and were apparently written by a Mr. Simpson in the 1780s.

Because the volumes were not listed in HCL’s online catalog (they have since been added), Special Collections librarian Ted Hathaway used an old card catalog to located the volumes, which had been tucked away in the 4th floor sequestered stacks at Minneapolis Central.

The volumes had been previously rebound in brown library buckram—a stiff, coated, poly-cotton cloth—which is currently used for bound periodicals and other general collection re-bindings. Because the Hawkins books were found to be in considerable disrepair, they were referred to the library’s Preservation Department. Preservation intern Jes Shimek, under the supervision of Frank Hurley, undertook the project of rebinding all five volumes. Jes’s purpose was not a full scale, period-correct restoration, but rather to provide all five volumes with handsome, sturdy new bindings, in order that the books could be enjoyed by HCL’s patrons. One of the volumes required complete dismantling and re-sewing onto recessed cords. All work was done in such a way so that it could be reversed, if desired, at a future juncture.

Jes commented on the process: “The process of taking apart each signature in volume 4, individually cleaning pages and reinforcing signature folds with Japanese tissue was one of the most meditative and Zen-like jobs I have done. To be able to hold and care for and strengthen something that historic, to become intimately acquainted with each page, is truly an amazing experience. My very favorite part, though, was re-sewing the book back together.”

Learn more about the preservation process and see more photos on our Flickr page.

Photo of Jes by Frank Hurley. All other photos by Jes Shimek.

Track

Tired? Depressed? radio advertisement

Artist

Minneapolis Public Library

Album

5" reel of ads for KBEM

Are you tired? Depressed?  Beef up your life with a book from your Minneapolis Public Library!

Special Collections continues to digitize a collection of reel tapes that date from the 1970s. These tapes were generated by, what was then, the Minneapolis Public Library. Most of the reels are recordings that were included in the library’s regular weekly program, Bookends.

This particular reel contains spot ads that were intended for broadcast on local Minneapolis radio station, KBEM. The voice you hear is that of station instructor, Warren Christy. Stay tuned for more sound clip highlights from the archive.

Granada. Suburban World. What’s Next?

Last week it was announced that the Suburban World Theater, at 3022 Hennepin Ave., has sold. Plans for the historic landmark were submitted early last year to turn the theater into retail space, which was then reviewed by the Minneapolis Heritage Preservation Commission. The fate of the theater is still unclear.

"Moorish on the outside, Venice at night within, the theater guarantees that you will leave the mundane problems of the day behind as you sit in the Venetian courtyard and watch a romance or adventure on the silver screen." -Ann Waters for ECCO News, January 1980

The atmospheric movie theater was designed by Jack Liebenberg in 1925, in sharp contrast to the architectural styles typical of the 1920s—Bauhaus school, Internationalists, and Art Deco among them. The 800-seat theater was the first in the Twin Cities to incorporate stadium style seating with the back rows on a steeper incline rather than a balcony. It was the second theater in the city to use sound projection (the first was the State, downtown). And it had several interesting features including an interior dome plastered in canestone (a material new in the 1920s, composed of gypsum, pigment, and ground sugarcane fiber), as well as a well water air-conditioning system.

The above photos were taken by John Peschman for the ECCO News article featured in January, 1980 (v.7 no.11). The photos are part of the East Calhoun Community Organization (ECCO) News Advisory Board Collection, which is currently being reorganized and described by a Special Collections intern.

My Minneapolis, by Perry Mack
In honor of National Poetry Month, we’re sharing poetry from the past. This poem about Minneapolis, by Perry Mack, was published in the Minneapolis Daily Star on May 11, 1923.

In June I’d like to be,
With you as company
Round Isles or Calhoun,
We’d paddle honeymoon,
While moonbeams shining dance,
On our canoe romance,
Oh, fair-haired city Miss,
My Minneapolis
High-res

My Minneapolis, by Perry Mack

In honor of National Poetry Month, we’re sharing poetry from the past. This poem about Minneapolis, by Perry Mack, was published in the Minneapolis Daily Star on May 11, 1923.

In June I’d like to be,

With you as company

Round Isles or Calhoun,

We’d paddle honeymoon,

While moonbeams shining dance,

On our canoe romance,

Oh, fair-haired city Miss,

My Minneapolis